sreido:

MASTER POST : NEW TRAINER ART DATAMINED!
KORRINA was found and so were the BATTLE CHATELAINE’S!
(Full view!)

(via mohja)

This was posted 15 hours ago. It has 22,009 notes.

goknights:

the drawings from my zine pajama party that I gave out to some people at SPX! these are all my characters from bffcomic 

This was posted 23 hours ago. It has 1,733 notes.

adrien-gromelle:

i-am-babulous:

ethevagabond:

ktshy:

adrien-gromelle:

I always had a thing for hand animated camera move and turn around…
I can’t tell exactly why…
probably cause it gives me the feeling I can manage everything and show exactly what I have in my head.
that can seems stupid but it makes me feel like, sculpting the animation more than drawing it.

DANG! Anyone know what these are from?

Credits Please cause these are awesome. 

Hey ethevagabond.  I tried, but unfortunately, I could only identify the first, MYOSIS.

Hi everyone… sorry to answer so late
the first is a shot I did in Myosis”(link)
the second was an ”exercice”(link) in 1st year at gobelins
the third is a shot I animated for the short ”Oni”(link) realized with friend as an FX exercise.
the last (it was the more painful to do) is a shot extracted from our opening for the Annecy animation Festival ”Hurley’s Irish”(link)

enjoy ;)

(via kantakun)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 23,195 notes.

hellyeahthomassanders:

Narrating People’s Lives: In the Aisles! (This man is my spirit animal XD) by Thomas Sanders

(via testchamberphi)

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2dtraditionalanimation:

Aladdin - Glen Keane

2dtraditionalanimation:

Aladdin - Glen Keane

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 47 notes. .

"There is no way illusions can come to life."Perfect Blue, 1997.

(Source: kanzakinao, via kantakun)

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"Before Drosselmeyer lost his hands, he’d already made a device that would enable him to continue weaving stories even if he lost his body. This town is being controlled by stories because of that device, but even we cannot tell which parts are real and which are fiction. However! No one inside Drosselmeyer’s stories was expected to become Princess Tutu, and yet she appeared and tried to protect you.”

(Source: rniracleromance)

This was posted 3 days ago. It has 3,127 notes.

ghibli-collector:

Sanzoku no Musume Ronja (Ronia the Robber’s Daughter) - Character sketches

The new TV series directed by Goro Miyazaki is a collaboration between Studio Ghibli and Polygon Pictures which aired its first two episodes in Japan yesterday.

(via mohja)

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englishsnow:

 Andrea Cheng

This was posted 3 days ago. It has 4,781 notes.

odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Town of Fenghuang, China

The town of Fenghuang is located in the Hunan province in China along the banks of the Tuo Jiang River. The town is exceptionally well-preserved and relatively untouched by modern urbanization.

The legacy of the Ming And Qing dynasties are preserved within the town, spanning 300 years of ancient heritage. In the ancient town zone, preservation of over 200 residential buildings, 30 streets, and hundreds of other ancient features and landmarks of the town has continued for hundreds of years.

Because of its unique geographical location, Fenghuang never suffered from the destruction of any natural disaster or suffered invasion from any wars. Even during the war of resistance against Japanese invasion, the isolated town of Fenghuang did not suffer occupation. In 1949, Fenghuang was peacefully liberated.

In the following 50 years, Fenghuang was spared any large-scale construction that occurred in nearby districts. As the people of Fenghuang cherish their valuable heritage, the local government has conducted strict control over all construction, continuing the preservation and the authenticity of the ancient town.

source

(via typette)

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This is an excellent writing advice from Chuck Palahniuk. This was first seen on tumblr. Unfortunately, when I clicked on the link, it no longer existed.

But, I still think it’s worth sharing.

writingadvice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not
use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands,
Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred
others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d
had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking
sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d
only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present
the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character
wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader
wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have
to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d
go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot,
leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the
smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her
butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically,
writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In
this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against
those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And
what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. Traffic
was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her
cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or
there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the
plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your
story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions
and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking
and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example:
“During roll call,
in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before
he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just
as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing,
you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your
character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary
character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come
by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see
all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No
doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the
line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was
going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up
drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic
accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then
you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and
words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details
of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most
basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters,
you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the
telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

Thanks Hiraku! (via wingedbeastieanji)

(Source: redactedbeastie, via batmanmistress)

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(Source: wyventrue, via 80sanime)

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zzgundam:

(some Judau sketches cropped from one of 80sanime's posts)

(via 80sanime)

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youneeeed:

The way home from school, Together, Goodbye!

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This was posted 6 days ago. It has 4,096 notes.

wannabeanimator:

Robin Hood (1973) | thumbnails by Milt Kahl (x)

This was posted 6 days ago. It has 499 notes.